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Destination Death
Destination Death

Season 1, Episode 10 · 1 year ago

EP11 Michaelangelo

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Where did Michaelangelo get his anatomical skills??? Intro by @benny_jets on instagram and follow the show @destinationdeathpodcast!!

Welcome back orwelcome to destinationdeath. Thank you for joining me today. Last week was very, very busy for me. Iactually took on about ten more hours at work than I was originally scheduled,so I had very little time to do research and much less time to actuallyrecord anything, but I am back at it today. I originally was going to do amore serious episode today, but I've been having fun with the wild and crazytopic. So I'll do a couple more of these before I jump back into some moreserious topics anyway, how is your weak? I have missed,recording a lot, but I have also been so tired, I'm trying to maintain abetter relationship with the gym, while also recording and working a crazyschedule, so it's been busy, but I really enjoy being busy. I came across the idea for today'sepisode at the gym. Actually, while I was watching one of my favoriteyoutubers Aska Mortitian- and I have mentioned them on here before- but theycover a lot of really crazy and fun death topics which I will probably alsocover someon here ECAUS. Some of them are just too good to pass up but checkthem out when you have some time because they are great, they have likea weird a weird vibe going on, but I kind of dig it so today. We're going totalk about art and death is such a popular topic in art and there'shundreds of painting, scultures texts and other mediums with death just allover them, but some might have been...

...inspired by death but are actually notdeath related, and many of you might not know that all of Michael Angelo'spieces were inspired and based off of human corpses. So with that little taste of today'sepisode, Let's get into my disclaimer the information in this podcast as wellas those that follow, is information readily available on the Internet. I'vespent my own time researching these events and have included onlyinformation I deem necessary in describing the events to my audience.That being said, some information topics and opinions expressed from thispoint on could be considered explicit, grotesque and or off pudding, so listenwith your own discretion all right. So, let's get into a littlebackground on Michael Angelo before we get into the death stuff, Aka the goodstuff, but Michael Angela was born on thesixth of March in our fourteen and seventy five in capraise Tuscany. After his birth, the family went backto Florence, where he was ultimately raised and his mother suffered from aterminal illness and died when he was six. After this he went to live with a nannyand her husband, and here his father actually owned a marble, quorry and asmall farm, and this is where he gained his love for marble. As a small boy, Michael Angelo was sentto Florence to study grammar under Francesco da Orbino. However, he showedlittle interest in school at all and preferred to copy paintings fromchurches and hang out around other artists from oethousand Hie hundred and ninetyoethousand hiet hundred and ninety two. He attended a humanist academy,...

...and here he used a lot of his learnings tochange his work in the outlook of his work and he was working around a lot of themost prominent philosophers and writers and artists of the day, and he was also in his first inte inapprenticeship with a dude named Lorenzo Damidici, and he was also likeworking with other artists of the time. So it was at this time that he started some of his like most wellknown, sculptor, so Madonna of the steps battle of the centaurs- and he was seventeen when he did his first likewell known sculptures and he was studying with a bunch ofother boys and this kid named Pietro, hit him in the face actually and causeda really ugly disfigurement of his nose. So if you ever see anylike portraits that have been done of Michael Andelo, that is what that is from so his guy. He was doing. His apprentice underLorenzo actually ended up dying in Oe, Tousanr fourtendren and ninety two and Michael Angelo kind of didn'treally have anywhere to go at this point. So he left the school he was atand he returned to his father's house and in the following months he carved awooden crucifix and he gave it as a gift to the Florentine Church, which this is where he has his firstintroduction to his anatomical studies. So the Florentine Church actually had achurch hospital and they were allowing...

...him to do anatomical study by flayingcorpses that have had accumulated at the hospital, and this is one of thefirst instances during his career that he was able to study anatomy bydissecting the cadabbers seventeen years old, cutting up dead bodies. So in one thousanr fortundred andninety seven, the French Ambassador to the Holy Sea, commissioned him to carb up Pieta, asculptor that shows the Virgin Mary grieving over the body of Jesus and the contract was agreed upon inAugust and he was twenty four at the time of its completion and it's one ofthe world's greatest masterpieces of sculpture and it is now being held in sint,Peter's Basilica. He returned to Florence in N,Fourteneen, N. Ninety nine, I okay, I'm going to pause for just asecond, because my neighbor keeps like drilling holes in their wall. So I amreally sorry if you hear any of that. They've been doing it for like thirtyminutes now, so I'm really not sure what they're doing but they've beendrilling a lot of holes. So I sincerely apologize if you hear it so he was Aske, then in one Thousanfore, tundred an ninety nine to finish a forty year old, unfinished productthat had been started by another artist, and it was supposed to be a colossalstatue of corara marble that portrays David as a symbol of Florentine freedom. So a lot of people know that thesculpture of David is one of the most well known sculptures by Michael Angelo,...

...so he ended up completing it in fifteeno four and it it basically skyrocketed him into fame. So he started gettingleft and Wright requests for him to do. Marble like statues for churches and the pope actually wanted him to do to like build an entire tomb for himwith forty marble statues in it. What you're going to do with fortymarble statues when you're dead, I'm not sure, but he wanted him to have itdone in four years, and that seems like the most stressful request ever he ended up working on the tomb forforty years and it was never satisfied the way he wanted it to be like he wasnever satisfied with the end result. So he was then asked to during during the forty years,while he's trying to bust out all these statues for the pope, he was asked topaint the ceiling of the sisteen Chapel, which obviously is another very famouswork of art by Michael Andelo and Michael Angulia was originallycommissioned to paint the twelve apostles on the sisteen chapel, but hekind of went to the pope and was like hey man. Just let me do what I want todo and I promise Youre really going to like it. So the pope was like I don't know, but all right, so he ended up painting a more complex scheme than what theyoriginally wanted, which obviously a lot of us know. It represents creation,the fall of man, the promise of Salvation Through propits genealogy ofChrist,...

...and so it stretches over five hundredsquare meters of ceiling contains over three hundred figures and at the centerare nine episodes from the book of Genesis, divided into God's creation ofthe Earth, God's creation of human kind and the state of humanity, asrepresented by Noah, and the supporting sides of the ceiling.There's twelve men and women who prophesized the coming of Jesus, sevenprofits of Israel and five sybols among tmost famous paintings on theceiling are the creation of Adam Adam and eve in the garden of Eden, theDeuge, the Prophet Jeremiah and the Cumaian Sybil. So now that we've covered much of hislife, let's talk about the elephant of the room, which is the statement I madea couple minutes ago about his study of corpses. And if you look up any of them marblepieces, he did especially David you'll notice. The insane amount of detail inthe muscles, the veins, even like the rib cage. He obviously knew a lot abouthuman anatomy. But how is the important question? The amazing quality of his work is theway that he's able to recreate the anatomical details, and most people whoare unaware would assume that he studied live models and had someonepose for him in order to recreate them in marble. And while this is somewhattrue, the majority of his anatomical prowess comes from the study anddissection of the deceased. He was not the first artist to getinspiration from dead bodies. Leonardo Davinci did it, but while he studied anatomy in the church,...

...it was illegal for him to do so. So Michael Angel created a bunch of thingsfor this church, but they kind of were just letting him use a back room andcutting people open in it, so they didn't cost. They didn't chargehim any money because he was just making statues for them, but he was getting corpses in return,which is very odd form of payment. Anyway, at the time like I said previously, hewas seventeen so when he was doing the corpses in the church, that was him in his later teenage years. So the corpses, however, were not alwaysjust like sick and homeless people that the church kind of took on these corpses would have been given tomedical stools for study anyway, because they didn't really have anyfamily to go to. He was also given the bodies ofcondemned criminals after execution, and the only stipulation of this wasthat they must be given a proper burial after he was done, flaying them andstudying them. So he would separate the skin from themuscle in order to see the muscle fibres under the skin. He would alsodisect the veins and arteries in order to properly place them on hissculptures in the wrists dorsums of the hands and feet and other areas. Youknow like elbows neck, all that so the proper burial part didn't reallyalways happened. He he had a like a group of people workingfor him. That would take the bodies when he was done with them, andsometimes they would sell them to medical schools or other artists. Healso had his same little group of friends that was working for him.Actually Di Dig Upgraves of People Aka Grave Rob for corpses if thereweren't enough dead criminals to get...

...him by this sounds psychotic at this point. If there weren't enough dead criminalsaround dig me up someone else's corpse anyway, he would create sketches of hisanatomical studies and many of them he destroyed them when he was done withthem. So he would like rite, draw all these sketches of like arms and legsand heads and veins and whatnot, and at the end he always kind of wasunhappy with them, so he would set them on fire or throw them in thetrash or whatever, but historians believe that there'sactually a large collection of his anatomical drawings, hidden behind thebody of God, painting on the ceiling of the sisteen chapel. Now, obviously, in order to recoverthose, they would need to completely destroy the painting, so it has sincebeen left untouched. There is something up there, they're, not sure what it is,but they think it could be his anatomical works and that my friends is Michael Angelo'slove affair with corpses. So how do I feel about him now? I think that using corpses was a very smart idea tostudy anatomy. I mean that's how I study anatme. How does anyone elsestudy anaomy, but I think it was not done in the proper way, andI mean it leaves a little bit of a distaste to me. I still find his work to be incrediblyanatomically correct and you know with with a lot of sculptors. I think it'sdifficult to get that fine amount of...

...detail with live subjects, so I don't know I appreciate it, but who knows you know the statuescould have been recreations of dead people that he grave robbed. You know anyway, do we still respect his work or do wefind it distasteful, knowing that he was robbing graves for the added detailin his sculptures? Let me know what you guys think and Iwill catch you guys. Next time don't forget to follow the show NtramDestination Death podcast. I will see later.

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