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Destination Death
Destination Death

Season 1, Episode 13 · 1 year ago

EP14 Medical Corner: Chagas Disease

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This disease is a doozy! Intro by @benny_jets on instagram and follow the show @destinationdeathpodcast!

Hello and welcome ACK TO MEDACAL Mornerwar welcome to Morner. Today I literally have about twenty minutesuntil I'm supposed to Leav for work, but I really wanted to record thisepisode right now. Sometimes I just get the urge to record,and today I'm having that urge, so we're going to get right into it. We'regoing to talk about CHAGAS disease. This is something that I heavilystudied in my last semester of college. I currently have my bachelors degree inbiology with a I guess: More in depth, study of Anatomy andPathophysiology, technically, there's no minor for that, but I've taken a lotof extra of those courses. So in my microbiology Class I had to picka disease that I wanted to study and I picked chagus disease. I didn't knowanything about it. I kind of just selected it off a list of a bunch ofdiseases. So here we are chagus. Disease is an ANTHRO poseinnosis. I don't know why. I tookthat long pauseright there, but it means that it originates or it isvectored via animals. The evector for this disease is an insect. The disease itself. The microorganismis a prodest, and this disease is commonly referredto as the Kissing bug disease and it can be spread between humans. It's it'snot airborne, it's not something that could very easily be spread from humanto human, but it can be transmitted through blood,transfusions, organ transplant, infected needles or in Utero, and itcauses about...

...thirteen hundred deaths every year. The locations for chagus disease aremainly South America. A lot of the Mexican peninsula is also an area thatfrequently sees this disease, so the actual bug itself is named.TRIPANESOMA cruisy and I posted a photo of it to theinstagram page. For this show it's pretty cute. It is it's kind of like looks like a reallylong worm with like a a fan attached to itsback. That's as best as I could describe it, but it has a prettyinteresting life cycle. It starts out as an Amas to goat, but first, the way that you getinfected is a tripomas to go, which isnat adult form of this microorganismwill be eaten or ingested by a kissing bug. The vector for thisdisease is the kissing bug the kissing bug drinks, the blood ofhumans, so the trip a mask agoat from a infected human will get eaten by the kissing bug where itwill differentiate into epimaste goats inside the gut of the kissing bug, then,in the latder part of the digestion in the bugit will differentiate again into metaciclicTRIPOMASTI goats. Now what will happen is the kissing bug will bite a humanand then also subsequently...

...poop on the human and the fecal matter is where these bugs are sothe the fequal matter gets into the cut or puncture wound from the bug andthen you're infected. So the MEDACICLIC tripomasticoats will infect the human.Then they will get inside the cells where they will use the actual human cells to reproduce themselves andthe like baby or like egg form of this bug is a mas to goats. So in acute disease, there's twodifferent types of the disease: There's acute and chronic in acute disease. Theblood concentration of t crusy is the highest. So you can see t cruisy onserology and a serology slide is what I posted on the instagram. So you can seethe size of the bug in comparison to red bloodcells. Acute disease can also be a symptomatic,so you can be infected and not know what you're infected common symptomsfor acute disease, our fever, tackicardia low appetite, syncapefatigue and shortness of breath. Acute stage is the only stage wheretreatment options are effective after acute infection becomes chronic chanceof recovery. Without organ transplantation is Salim, so thisdisease is actually quite dangerous. There is also technically adormant or indeterminatestage. This isn't super well studied, because a lot of people that are inthis stage don't know that they're sick, so they don't seek medical attention...

...and basically, once the blood concentration becomes lower, thatis an indication that t crusy has infected most of the body's cells asopposed to just free floating in the circulatory system. So it can literally take over any cellthat it wants about. Twenty five percent of patients in theundeterminate stage will graduate quote unquote to the chronic phase of diseaseand detection of t cruisy in the dormant stage is incredibly rare, andthat is because a lot of these bugs are actually now inside the cell and not inblood. Patients are a symptomatic in theindeterminate stage and they could have had symptoms in the acute phase thatwent away. A lot of the acute symptoms are symptoms of like the flu or thecommon cold. So a lot of times when patients go to the doctor with a twocruisy infection in the acute stage, the doctor is under the assumption thatit's a common cold, the flu, it could be a respiratory infection. You knowstuff like that. So a lot of times the doctor just says, you'll be fine. Yoursymptoms will go away in a couple weeks because you have a cold and a lot ofpeople just seem to believe that, so that is kind of why this disease is sodangerous, because a lot of the medical centers in the areas that aremost effective affected are not the best for dealing with things of this nature. So in chronic disease, bloodconcentration of t cruisy is the lowest due to high cellular concentration of tcruisy. So the same thing, I've been saying this whole time once you're inthe chronic in determinate phase. They...

...are in your cells now and no longer inyour blood can be life threatening treatments are rarely beneficial in thechronic stage. There's no like medication. You can take to get rid of tea cruisy once it's inthe cells. It's incredibly difficult to treat. Symptoms include heart failure, megacolon mega asophagus and neurological problems if you've never seen aMegacolin, definitely look it up on the Internet. It is so wild how big colonscan get when chronic infection sets in another. Big Symptom is generalizedorgan Adema, which is the collection of water where water is normally notcollected. So the dangerous part of this disease is a kind of a graduation to chronicsigastic cardiomiopathy, where it's called CCC. One third to one half of patients willdevelop chronic tigastic, cardio miopathy, and it's caused by thedilation of the Atria and the ventrical where the ventrical walls are thinnedand they are replaced by fibrous tissue. Dilation of all four chambers iscommonly discovered upon atopsy and T cruisy is able to infiltrate the Perrycardium. However, it's rarely discovered in the Maiacardim, so tcruzzy is able to infiltrate the cells that surround the heart, but they arenot able to infiltrate the actual muscle cells of the heart, so they willsit basically in between the heart, the like protective sack around the heartand the actual muscle of the heart itself, and cause a bunch ofinflammation which turns the heart...

...muscle into fibrous tissue, whichbasically means your heart is being converted into scar tissue. Soobviously this is a really dangerous thing. Diagnosis is typically done withterology xrays for abnormals organs. In the chronic phase, doctors willattempt to recreate a travel history and they'll take some samples ofcells,but honestly, there's there's not much. You can do wanter in the chronic phase treatments for acute disease. You cantake antibiotics for this. They don't work well, so generally, what they'll do is they will treat youwith chemotherapy drugs, so Benz, Nizidole and Ni for Tomox are two cemotherapy drugs that they will use to treat chagas. They tend to not like to usekhemotherapy drugs on children, so they will go the antiparasitic antibiotic route first, normally those don't work very well, sothey will then ultimately have to do the CEMO therapy. Drugs Kemo therapy drugs have awfully aggressive side effects, so just treatment for this disease andthis disease overall is not fun for anyone. Medical staff included treatments forchronic disease. Our organ transplant is really not much. You can do hereonce you are granted an organ transplant. The disease will reinfectthat organ. So it's potent there's the...

...potential to have the same problemagain, because there's just no way to get rid of all the bugs and the treatment of symptoms,including pacemakers for heart, drugs to control, heart rhythm blood,thinners. You know Antiadema types of medications. They are working on a bunch ofdifferent treatments. They have apparently a vaccine in progress. I'mnot sure how well that will work just because of the proliferation of thesebugs, but we could see what happens. There is some cause for concern,kissing bugs generally live in warmer areas, which is why we find them mostlylocated near the equator. That being said, with global warming, kissing bugshave now migrated farther north. They are definitely inMexico and they are certainly in the south of the US fifty one percent ofkissing bugs in Texas our believed to be infected with T cruisy. There arestrains of t cruizy that are becoming resistant to the previously mentionedcemotherapy drugs, which means that this disease is becoming it's coming closer to us, and it isalso becoming resistant to the only drugs that we know to work. So this ispotentially cause for concern. Please wear bug spray. If you live in thesouthern us. I cannot even stress this enough. I am allergic to Bugspray, butI still find a way to use some kind of it so that I do not get infected and alot of patients do not know they are infected until they're in the chronicphase of disease. So please, if you are...

...bitten by anything and you live in thesouthern part of the United States or you visit another country, especiallysomewhere near the equator. You should probably get checked out by a doctor and if you get bitten by something andthen you have any crazy symptoms or side effects, also get checked by adoctor, because you never know so that is chagus disease. Let me knowif you have any questions for me on it. I did do quite a bit of study on it.That's just a general overview. I didn't want to get to sciency with it,because a lot of the stuff that I did study was like on the cellular level. So let me know follow the show on Instagram atdestination, death podcast, and I will see you guys later this week. Well, Iwon't see you but you'll, hear me later this week, not sure what my ne nextepisode's going to come out or what it's going to be about, but for now Ihope you enjoy this episode and I think you guys have a Great Day Goodbye.

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