Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Destination Death
Destination Death

Season 2, Episode 1 · 6 months ago

Joseph Lister

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Come here to learn about victorian medicine and brutal surgeries. Joseph Lister has it all! 

Intro music by @benny_jets on instagram! 

My personal instagram @rchlprvtz 

Please rate, share, and listen! 

Sources for this episode include 

The Butchering Art By Emma Fitzharris 

Wikipedia "Joseph Lister"

"The First Mastectomy: Truth or Legend?" by Luiz Marinho

Hello and welcome back to destinationdeath or welcome to destination death. If you are tuning in for the first timeit has been quite a while, since I have uploaded a new episode, I know pleaserefrain from killing me. I have no excuses. I just want to makenew content for the show and move on from here with new goals and ideas, andI hope you guys will stick with me on this journey. I was recently informed by spotify thatI have listeners in over five countries and of all age groups, and that isseriously incredible when I started this last year. I really thought I wasjust going to be talking to myself, but...

...you guys have really made me, feelloved and reduced my anxiety over my radio voice. So thank you for that, andI hope you will continue to listen and share me with your friends. How have we been? I have been doing pretty well, I havechanged hair colors a few times since I last posted an episode and not that youguys can really see it through here. But if you want you can follow mypersonal instagram to see what it looks like or what it has looked like. Let me know if you think my voicematches my face, because I am curious about that. My instagram handle will be in thedescription of this episode. I don't really post ther much because I'mtrying to have a more meaningful life outside of the Internet, but I check inevery so often- and I read my messages and notifications and so on. I got a dog pretty recently and I alsobought a house. I closed on it one week after my twentyfifth birthday, so I'm pretty proud of...

...that accomplishment. I am glad to be sitting here. Recordinghonestly I've really missed it. I just had to go into my attic to fish mymicrophone out of a box that I haven't opened since I moved in, and mymicrophone now smells like incense, so iam enjoying that, while I'm sittinghere recording this episode, I have been struggling with what towrite for episodes for a while, since I have not posted in a long time. Everytime I try to sit down and like write out a script or put together somethoughts for an episode I just get really overwhelmed so, but today I was able to sit down andgather some thoughts and actually put together an episode for the most part,the ending I'm going to have to wing it a little bit, but that's okay. This isa topic that I'm kind of knowledgeable on, so I think we'll we'll make do so.Anyway, let's go ahead and get to the...

...good stuff. I'm reading you guys reallyfascinating biography about Joseph Lister today, who is a real pioneer inthe medical field? There is a little bit of blood and Gores here, so itwon't be too boring for you, but I wanted to do an episode on him becauseI was walking through my local barns and noble, and I noticed that thebutchering art by MMA fit Harris was on display and it reminded me of JosephLister and if you guys have an opportunity to read the book, I'm sureyou will also find it fascinating. Also, the cover art is really pretty it's.Like Victorian era, the fant is nice, it just looks really good on yourbedside table. Even if you don't read it, it's one of those like aestheticthings where you could just put it there. People will come over to yourhouse and think that you've read it. Even if you don't some of the information I have a not taken but gathered from her bookand other information IV researched on the Internet. So I'll read off some ofmy sources later so...

...without further IDOU. Let's start witha quick intro of his premedicinal life, Joseph was born in Essex near London onApril Fifth, Eighteen, twenty seven lister's father was a scientist andactually developed the first multifocal Lens for microscopes, which greatlyimpacted the field of bacteriology. So basically, the microscopes that weuse now in laboratory science were heavily impacted by lister's father, his family were quakers and he attendedprivate quaker schools until he was seventeen as a child. Joseph was alwaysattracted to mathematics and science and would frequently perform disectionsof small animals and fish, which were then examined using his father'smicroscope. Honestly, it sounds like something I would do too. So I'm about it. ININ seighthudren and forty sevenlister achieved a bachelor of Arts embotany from the University College,London, Medical School, which also...

...happened to be one of the only schoolsthat will allow quager students at the time, Inin Eighteen N. fifty two listergraduated with a Bachelor's in medicine and he passed Ino. He passed hisexamination required by the Royal College of Surgeons. He was given theoption to move around England, traveling and learning in differenthospitals in England, but he decided to settle in Edinburgh and study underJames Syme who, as at the time, considered to be the best surgeon inEngland, sime was so impressed by lister that he was appointed housesurgeon which allowed him to assist or watch every surgery performed by SIME.It was during these surgeries that he first started noting noticing issueswith cleanliness and surgical preparation. So I think you probably know where thisis going. We've all heard stories of like civilwar imputations, and we are there now all surgeries at this time were donewithout any kind of anethesia, meaning all patients were awake during surgicalprocedures, no matter how large this...

...seems absolutely insane now, with allthe advancements that have been made. However, at the time a wapping thirty,five percent of all amputations contracted some kind of infectionthrough their wound, whether it be from unclean surgical practices or improperafter care. I was honestly really surprised by the thirty five percentstatistic. I thought it was going to be closer to like seventy, but I guess, if you get an infection and you diefrom it, are they counting that death as causedby that infection or caused by something else? It's food for thought.Honestly, hospitals were seen as places where yougo to die. Hospitals were not regularly cleaned and there was little to nounderstanding of how disease spreads. Germ theory was a new concept, and manypeople did not believe that microscopic...

...organisms could cause disease. Many men,stutying to be doctors, would die after accidentally cutting themselves afterworking on a cadaver. They did not often use gloves or clean any utensilsused in disections. Therefore, tools that could have been used in a daysection in a day section of a human body were then used in surgery withoutbeing properly sanitized, so you've got a corpse that could have any number ofdiseases bloodborn or not, being sliced open with the same toolsthat someone then uses to cut off your toe. Many doctors would not even changeaprons between surgeries, transferring bloodborn diseases and micro organismsfrom one patient to the next. I think, honestly, if I had to havesurgery withou without anathesia...

...count me out, I'm just not doing it. I don't care what happens. I feel like the recovery after that hasto be worse than the actual surgery itself, because eventually you'llprobably just go into shock and be chilling in chalk for a while.But after that, no way from watching all these surgerieslister started to notice some trends. He noticed that patients in bed next toeach other would become sick if one had a disease and the other didn't. He alsonoticed that infection spread more rapidly through the hospital. Whenhospital staff did not wash their hands clean, the surgical devices andutensils or change aprons or clothes between patients, now, obviously we know now what, with all the precautions nowadays, that not changing aprons or cleaning thingsproperly is a really quick way to...

...become diseased, which is likely why people felt that hospitalswere where you go to die. So lister started washing his handsmore frequently and encouraged others in the hospital to do so as well. Henoticed that I greatly reduced the rates of infection of his surgicalpatients. He could not, however, figure out why some patients still had issueswith their wounds becoming infected. He started by changing the diression. Watiam really struggling to talk today. I don't know of it is that I haven'trecorded in so long, but I do not feel like. I want to rerecord thisepisode, especially after getting this far into it. So you'll just have tobear with my messups for this episode. However, he decided that he was going to startchanging the dressings on the wounds every day and washing the wounds out.This helped slightly but did not fix...

...the problem. He then came up with anidea. If there was something living in the wound causing the Infection Akamicre organisms, he would have to kill it somehow, so he decided to startspraing, carbolic acid, on wounds and in the air around his surgical suite onthe utensils and on the dressings for wins. Therefore, nothing came into contactwith a patient that wasn't at one point covered in carboic acid. He noticed adrastic decline in the rate of infection and, while not all surgeonsjumped on to the disinfectant train immediately, he is credited withcreating the anteseptic surgical method. The story that I wanted to tell aboutthis guy is that this I'm going to have to tell for mymemory. So if I chop it all up, I am sorry, but my favorite story that I wasreading from Fitz Haris's book was the...

...one about lister sister, who was diagnosed with breast cancer, and apparently there were some doctors that said thather breast cancer was inoperable. They refused to operate on it. They did notwant to risk either it getting infected or not being able to get it all out,and then she just went through surgery for nothing. So lister was like it'scool. I got this she's not going to get infection. It's all it's all great. So, instead of doing what, maybe other doctors would do, hedecides to perform the surgery at his house anduse his dining room table as his operating table this? I do not advise for anyonewanting to try it, so he set up his entire dining room tobe the surgical sueit and he...

...sprayed the whole thing down with hiscarbolic acid he's prayed as sisters wounds he he he did it all. He cleaned off allhis tools, all of it, so his sister gets there. She lays downshe's getting ready. He's like this is going to hurt a lot she's like yeahyeah, whatever it's okay and then he just starts slicing intoher and performs masectomy on her with no Anosesa in his dining room, and she survives and the sad thing about it is that sheended up dying like a couple years later. Not from cancer but from someother illness which sucks because he put a lot of effort into saving herlife from cancer, and then she just...

...died from something else. So that puts a little bit of a damper on hissuccess there. But another one of the stories about himthat I really liked was. He was the only person that was allowed to treat thequeen because of his success with the low infections like they called himup and they were like hey the queen has like an A. I think she had like a sistor an absess like next to her knee and they were like. Can you come andjust take a look at it and see like what you can do, because I guess it wasreally bothering her. So he goes and he lances the boil anddrains it cleans it out and it does. It doesn't end up coming back, but myfavorite quote from him is that he was the only man to stick a knife in thequeen and live anyway. A lot of people think thatlisterene is named after lister. It may...

...or may not be. It has nothing to dowith him, but I guess it does have antisepticproperties for inside hi your mouth, so I mean I could see the resemblance, but not exactly. He is basically the reasonwhy hospitals are so clean now why there are so many different types ofdisinfectance, and why now we know how diseases are transmitted, especiallybread, blood born ones anyway. I hope that you guys reallyenjoy this episode. I'm going to try to put out some more. I have to recordwhen my boyfriend and my dog are not home, because they are my way rends not aloud, but my dog isvery loud, so I am going to try to put out a few moreepisodes for this season. Well see where that gets me, but welcome toseason to I'm hoping to have some...

...really good content for you guys. I'mexcited to be back at it to have my Mike infront of me go ahead and stop by my instagram. Ifyou want it will be in the description of thispodcast. I almost said video, who am I anyway, it comes, say, hello and sharethe podcast with your friends, your favorite episode, whatever you want, Iwill catch you guys next time, thanks for listening.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (20)